Category Archives: Cortisone injection

“Ooohhh, My Aching Knee!” Insider Secrets on How You Can Get Relief Quickly and Easily!

When your knee hurts, getting relief is all that’s on your mind. Getting the right relief, though, depends on knowing what’s wrong. The correct diagnosis will lead to the correct treatment.

Know Your Knee!knee-arthritis

The knee is the largest joint in the body. It’s also one of the most complicated. The knee joint is made up of four bones that are connected by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The femur (large thigh bone) interacts with the two shin bones, the tibia (the larger one) located towards the inside and the fibula (the smaller one) located towards the outside. Where the femur meets the tibia is termed the joint line. The patella, (the knee cap) is the bone that sits in the front of the knee. It slides up and down in a groove in the lower part of the femur (the femoral groove) as the knee bends and straightens.

Ligaments are the strong rope-like structures that help connect bones and provide stability. In the knee, there are four major ligaments. On the inner (medial) aspect of the knee is the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and on the outer (lateral) aspect of the knee is the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). The other two main ligaments are found in the center of the knee. These ligaments are called the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). They are called cruciate ligaments because the ACL crosses in front of the PCL. Other smaller ligaments help hold the patella in place in the center of the femoral groove.

Two structures called menisci sit between the femur and the tibia. These structures act as cushions or shock absorbers. They also help provide stability for the knee. The menisci are made of a tough material called fibrocartilage. There is a medial meniscus and a lateral meniscus. When either meniscus is damaged it is called a “torn cartilage”.

There is another type of cartilage in the knee called hyaline cartilage. This cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the bones in the knee joint. In the knee, hyaline cartilage covers the ends of the femur, the femoral groove, the top of the tibia and the underside of the patella. Hyaline cartilage allows the knee bones to move easily as the knee bends and straightens.

Tendons connect muscles to bone. The large quadriceps muscles on the front of the thigh attach to the top of the patella via the quadriceps tendon. This tendon inserts on the patella and then continues down to form the rope-like patellar tendon. The patellar tendon in turn, attaches to the front of the tibia. The hamstring muscles on the back of the thigh attach to the tibia at the back of the knee. The quadriceps muscles are the muscles that straighten the knee. The hamstring muscles are the main muscles that bend the knee.

Bursae are small fluid filled sacs that decrease the friction between two tissues. Bursae also protect bony structures. There are many different bursae around the knee but the ones that are most important are the prepatellar bursa in front of the knee cap, the infrapatellar bursa just below the kneecap, the anserine bursa, just below the joint line and to the inner side of the tibia, and the semimembranous bursa in the back of the knee. Normally, a bursa has very little fluid in it but if it becomes irritated it can fill with fluid and become very large.

Is it bursitis… or tendonitis…or arthritis?

Tendonitis generally affects either the quadriceps tendon or patellar tendon. Repetitive jumping or trauma may set off tendonitis. The pain is felt in the front of the knee and there is tenderness as well as swelling involving the tendon. With patellar tendonitis, the infrapatellar bursa will often be inflamed also. Treatment involves rest, ice, and anti-inflammatory medication. Injections are rarely used. Physical therapy with ultrasound and iontopheresis may help.

Bursitis pain is common. The prepatellar bursa may become inflamed particularly in patients who spend a lot of time on their knees (carpet layers). The bursa will become swollen. The major concern here is to make sure the bursa is not infected. The bursa should be aspirated (fluid withdrawn by needle) by a specialist. The fluid should be cultured. If there is no infection, the bursitis may be treated with anti-jnflammatory medicines, ice, and physical therapy. Knee pads should be worn to prevent a recurrence once the initial bursitis is cleared up.

Anserine bursitis often occurs in overweight people who also have osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain and some swelling is noted in the anserine bursa. Treatment consists of steroid injection, ice, physical therapy, and weight loss.

The semimembranous bursa can be affected when a patient has fluid in the knee (a knee effusion). The fluid will push backwards and the bursa will become filled with fluid and cause a sensation of fullness and tightness in the back of the knee. This is called a Baker’s cyst. If the bursa ruptures, the fluid will dissect down into the calf. The danger here is that it may look like a blood clot in the calf. A venogram and ultrasound test will help differentiate a ruptured Baker’s cyst from a blood clot. The Baker’s cyst is treated with aspiration of the fluid from the knee along with steroid injection, ice, and elevation of the leg.

Knock out knee arthritis… simple steps you can take!

Younger people who have pain in the front of the knee have what is called patellofemoral syndrome (PFS). Two major conditions cause PFS. The first is chondromalacia patella. This is a condition where the cartilage on the underside of the knee cap softens and is particularly common in young women. Another cause of pain behind the knee cap in younger people may be a patella that doesn’t track normally in the femoral groove. For both chondromalacia as well as a poorly tracking patella, special exercises, taping, and anti-inflammatory medicines may be helpful. If the patellar tracking becomes a significant problem despite conservative measures, surgery is need.

While many types of arthritis may affect the knee, osteoarthritis is the most common. Osteoarthritis usually affects the joint between the femur and tibia in the medial (inner) compartment of the knee. Osteoarthritis may also involve the joint between the femur and tibia on the outer side of the knee as well as the joint between the femur and patella. Why osteoarthritis develops is still being scrutinized carefully. It seems to consist of a complex interaction of genetics, mechanical factors, and immune system involvement. The immune system attacks the joint through a combination of degradative enzymes and inflammatory chemical messengers called cytokines.

Patients will sometimes feel a sensation of rubbing or grinding. The knee will become stiff if the patient sits for any length of time. With local inflammation, the patient may experience pain at night and get relief from sleeping with a pillow between the knees. Occasionally, locking and clicking may be noticed. Patients with osteoarthritis may also tear the fibrocartilage cushions (menisci) in the knee more easily than people without osteoarthritis.

So how is the arthritis treated? An obvious place to start is weight reduction for patients who carry around too many pounds.

Strengthening exercises for the knee are also useful for many people. These should be done under the supervision of a physician or physical therapist.

Other therapies include ice, anti inflammatory medicines, and occasionally steroid injections. Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements may be helpful. A word of caution… make sure the preparation you buy is pure and contains what the label says it does. The supplement industry is unregulated… so buyer beware!

Injections of the knee with viscosupplements – lubricants- are particularly useful for many patients. Special braces may help to unload the part of the joint that is affected.

Arthroscopic techniques may be beneficial in special circumstances. Occasionally, a surgical procedure called an osteotomy, where a wedge of bone is removed from the tibia to “even things out,” may be recommended. Joint replacement surgery is required for end stage knee arthritis.

Research is being done to develop medicines that will slow down the rate of cartilage loss. Targets for these new therapies include the destructive enzymes and/or cytokines that degrade cartilage. It is hoped that by inhibiting these enzymes and cytokines and by boosting the ability of cartilage to repair itself, that therapies designed to actually reverse osteoarthritis may be created. These are referred to as disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs or “DMOADs.” Genetic markers may identify high risk patients who need more aggressive therapies.

Newer compounds that are injected into the knee and provide healing as well as lubrication are also being developed. And finally, less invasive surgical techniques are also being looked at. Recent technological advances in “mini” knee replacement look very promising.

The technology that will revolutionize our approach to knee osteoarthritis is the use of mesenchymal stem cells.  These are stem cells derived from “non-blood” tissues such as fat, bone marrow, or even the lining of the joint. Studies in both animals as well as humans have shown great potential for these cells to regenerate cartilage.

For more information on arthritis treatments and other arthritis problems,  go to:

Arthritis Treatment

And don’t forget to sign up for  free weekly arthritis tips and a free copy of our special report “The Consumer’s Guide to Arthritis”

Just go here Contact

Steroid injections for tennis elbow make it worse

Genevra Pittman writing in Reuters reported that in an Australian study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers evaluated 165 adults with tennis elbow.

tennis-elbowThe participants were divided into four treatment groups: cortisone shots without physical therapy, cortisone shots with physical therapy, placebo shots without physical therapy, and placebo shots with physical therapy. After one year, 83% of the participants who received a cortisone shot reported that they had completely recovered, compared to 96% of those who received a placebo shot.

Steroid shots weaken tendons over the long haul.  A much more physiologic approach is to use ultrasound guided needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma (PRP).

For more information on arthritis treatments and other arthritis problems,  go to:

Arthritis Treatment

And don’t forget to sign up for  free weekly arthritis tips and a free copy of our special report “The Consumer’s Guide to Arthritis”

Just go here Contact

What can be done about osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and affects approximately 28 million Americans.  While it has been viewed as a “wear and tear” phenomenon, it has become quite clear that it is a disease that is multifactorial in its development.

It is not a benign disease because, in addition to the pain, OA leads to functional disability.

The joint is a dynamic structure where anabolic (building) activities are counterbalanced by catabolic (destructive) activities.

With OA, the catabolic activities gradually overtake the anabolic ones. While there are attempts at repair, these attempts are dysfunctional , leading to the formation of bony spurs, called osteophytes.osteoarthritis-knee

There are three major risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis.  They are genetic (usually a family history is prominent), constitutional (obesity in the case of OA of the knee, and aging), and finally local components (injury and ligamentous laxity).

Cartilage consists of cells called chondrocytes that sit inside a “soup”, a matrix, which consists of collagen and proteoglycans.cartilage_1

The development of osteoarthritis starts with an initial injury to cartilage.

The injury may trigger an inflammatory response leading to the synthesis of cartilage matrix degrading enzymes, produced by chondrocytes. Over time, the catabolic activities override anabolic activities and abnormal repair mechanisms lead to the formation of osteophytes, while cartilage continues to degrade.

The treatment for osteoarthritis is primarily symptomatic.  Analgesics (pain nsaidsrelievers), non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), weight loss, exercise, assistive devices such as wedge insoles, braces, canes, walkers, and such. Injection of glucocorticoids and viscosupplements (lubricants viscosupplementderived either from rooster combs or from bacteria) may also be helpful.

knee-joint-replacement-surgeryEventually patients will require surgery in the form of joint replacement. Joint replacement surgery has come a long way, but there are still concerns about them.  The first is the possibility of a surgical complication such as blood clot or infection.  The second issue is the finite lifespan of the prosthesis.  They usually last 10 to 15 years but this is a function of activity and joint replacement patients do have restrictions on their activity level.  Persistent pain due to particle induced inflammation can also be a problem.

Finally, the chance of faulty prosthetic devices such as the recent  Johnson & Johnson metal-on-metal hip debacle, makes the choice of total joint replacement less attractive.

Recent developments in stem cell technology may provide an alternative to joint replacement.

For more information on osteoarthritis treatments and other arthritis problems go to:

Arthritis Treatment

And don’t forget to sign up for  free weekly arthritis tips and a free copy of our special report “The Consumer’s Guide to Arthritis”

Just go here Contact

Iliopsoas bursitis… an underdiagnosed cause of hip pain

Bursitis is a term that describes inflammation of a bursa- the small sacks that surround joints.

One of the more common conditions that causes pain in the front of the hip is iliopsoas bursitis. This is particularly common in active people who exercise regularly.

The iliopsoas muscle originates from the inside of the pelvis as well as the lumbar spine. This muscle inserts onto a small bony ridge on the upper femur (upper leg bone).

The iliopsoas bursa is a small fluid filled sac that lies just behind the iliopsoas muscle and in front of the hip joint. Its purpose is to provide cushioning for the hip joint as well as to ensure proper gliding of the tendons adjacent to it.

As with many types of bursae, inflammation can affect the iliopsoas bursa. When this occurs, the patient will experience pain in the groin as well as the front of the thigh. The pain is aggravated by flexing (bending)  the hip. Activities such as walking, running, and climbing stairs can be painful.hip-flexor

Sometimes patients may hold their leg with the hip slightly bent and the foot turned out in order to minimize discomfort. Patients may also have a limp.

On examination, there is tenderness when pressure is placed directly over the front of the hip. In severe cases, the bursa may be swollen.

While overactivity or trauma may be the most common cause of this type of bursitis, arthritis can also lead to iliopsoas bursitis.

Between 15 to 20% of the time, the bursa communicates with the hip joint. In situations like this, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate whether the discomfort is coming from the bursa versus the joint.

The diagnosis is suspected by taking a careful history and doing a careful physical examination. The clinical impression can be confirmed by either magnetic resonance imaging or diagnostic ultrasound.

The treatment for this condition is usually conservative to start with. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy may be helpful.

Ice may also be palliative.

Aspiration of fluid from the bursa and simultaneous injection of  glucocorticoid using ultrasound guidance can be curative. On rare occasion, the bursitis may return. If the bursitis does recur, aspiration followed by needle fenestration and injection with platelet rich plasma (PRP) may be effective.

If the bursitis recurs repeatedly, surgery may be required.

For more information on bursitis and related disorders go to:

Arthritis Treatment

And don’t forget to sign up for  free weekly arthritis tips and a free copy of our special report “The Consumer’s Guide to Arthritis”

Just go here Contact